Antifragility proposed as a new approach to water treatment by URI professor“It’s a paradigm that could apply to all sorts of water treatmen...

Antifragility proposed as a new approach to water treatment by URI professor“It’s a paradigm that could apply to all sorts of water treatmen...Antifragility proposed as a new approach to water treatment by URI professor
“It’s a paradigm that could apply to all sorts of water treatment technologies or water system designs,” said Goodwill. “We are exploring one or two specific aspects of it at URI, but the hope is professors and researchers at institutions anywhere in the world might grab hold of this idea and find ways to apply it to their local systems.”


This total organic carbon analyzer measured the amount of natural organic matter in the water in one of Providence’s water tanks. Natural organic matter is a precursor to the formation of trihalomethane and removing it before colorization is a typical trihalomethane control strategy. (Photo by Neil Nachbar)
Two examples of emerging antifragile treatment processes Goodwill and the students in his lab are researching are the use of ferrate preoxidation and manganese oxides.

“I’m excited about the preliminary data we are generating on manganese oxides as a possible way to incorporate antifragility into a water system,” said Goodwill. “Manganese, which accounts for a significant portion of the Earth’s crust, is generally tolerated really well by humans. It’s not something typically used in water treatment, but I’m hopeful that by combining manganese oxide with oxidants it might be a unique way to do advanced oxidation.”