Historically bulkheads, seawalls, and other hardened structures were used along the Carolina coast to protect from the forces of erosion, waves,...

Historically bulkheads, seawalls, and other hardened structures were used along the Carolina coast to protect from the forces of erosion, waves,...Historically bulkheads, seawalls, and other hardened structures were used along the Carolina coast to protect from the forces of erosion, waves, and storms. But there is a rise in the use of living shorelines, a stabilization technique that uses natural materials like rocks, oyster reefs, and plants. Living shorelines are better for water quality, property protection, and fish habitat. This episode features a discussion with Carter Smith, a marine scientist at Duke University, Lexia Weaver, a coastal scientist with the North Carolina Coastal Federation, and Daniel Govoni, a policy analyst for the NC Department of Environmental Quality. They explain the many benefits of living shorelines, incentivizing property owners to install them, and policy changes to support their use.