Creating a New Fertilizer from Biomass | | SBU NewsInnovative research could lead to more sustainable agricultural practices; Stony Brook-led wo...

Creating a New Fertilizer from Biomass | | SBU NewsInnovative research could lead to more sustainable agricultural practices; Stony Brook-led wo...Creating a New Fertilizer from Biomass | | SBU News

Innovative research could lead to more sustainable agricultural practices; Stony Brook-led work supported by NSF

STONY BROOK, NY, December 22, 2022 – Imagine being able to develop a low cost and sustainable fertilizer that improves the production of crops and plant growth by repurposing the massive amounts of biomass waste that exist worldwide. This is the goal of Benjamin S. Hsiao, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Stony Brook University. He and colleagues at Stony Brook and University of Queensland in Australia (led by Darren Martin, PhD, Professor of Chemical Engineering) are embarking on a project to achieve this. The research, which would enhance sustainability practices and therefore have an impact on pollution and climate change, is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of its Convergence Accelerator Program on sustainable materials solutions and capabilities.

The use of conventional fertilizers in agriculture worldwide is not sustainable for several reasons. These include high delivery inefficiency, significant consumptions of water and energy, and the high occurrence of negative environmental impacts, such as greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient runoff pollutants to water.

Stony Brook and University of Queensland will partner in a project that aims to demonstrate a new kind of nanocellulose-enabled bio-nanofertilizer for agricultural applications as well as biogels for infrastructural protection and reduction of the impact of drought. The team will advance a zero-waste technology that creates high valued nanocellulose products from any biomass feedstocks (underutilized agricultural waste, recycled papers and boxes, and food waste), which can be used for professionals and scientists for varying applications to combat climate change.