Human Dimension of Development, Climate Change and Carbon Management

Human Dimension of Development, Climate Change and Carbon Management

International Conference Focusing on "Human Dimension of Development, Climate Change and Carbon Management"

About Conference

Since the inception of early civilization, man has been striving for better life style and making his life more comfortable. In search of which he has altered the nature and this desire has compelled him to proceed on the road of development. Presently, extracting services from environment and coping with natural hazards are being shared by human being with other living entities. What makes us "human" is a question which could be answered by believing in Darwin, the most important tendency is selection pressure based on fitness for an environmental condition , which concentrates on the defining feature of humanity i.e. how one can expend resources to keep a wider spectrum of fitness alive. This wider spectrum includes both youth and old which simply means the young carry the new genes and grow while elderly carry the memories and experiences that define our existence on this earth.

To make our existence over this earth more comfortable, in the era of rapid industrialization consciously or unconsciously human has unscientifically utilize the natural resources and resulting into the major problems of 21st century including environmental pollution and global warming on the one hand and creating more problems to the human beings by ignoring human dimensions on the other.

With the dethronement of growth rates as the sole measure of development, there has been increasing attention in recent years to the question of the participation of different sectors of the population in the development process and in the distribution of the benefits of growth. When development is regarded as a process calling for participation of all members of a society, it must be seen as a set of complex social and economic relationships evolving over a period of time, the nature of which it is often difficult to grasp. Such long-term relationships however have to be taken into account in development policy formulation, implementation and evaluation.

The growing realization that anthropogenic climate change is a reality has focused the attention of the scientific community, policymakers and the general public on the rising concentration of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and on the carbon cycle in general. Initial attempts, through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol, are underway to slow the rate of increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These societal actions require a scientific understanding of the carbon cycle, and are placing increasing demands on the international science community to establish a common, mutually agreed knowledge base to support policy debate and action at global level needed and it’s application at local level focusing on human dimension of development, environment and carbon management.

Development is a sine-quo of any economy and consideration of human dimension, environment and carbon management are important aspects and needs special focus of attention of international community, policy makers and policy executors.

Human dimensions work on interdisciplinary research into human behaviours in natural environments involving researchers from both the social sciences and the humanities focusing on the human dimensions of development and climate change and aims to build understandings of people’s behaviours in relation to development, environmental management and providing knowledge for environmental managers and policy makers. It connects to universal concepts such as fairness, justice, risk, and sustainability and quantitative and qualitative research in Human Dimensions of Development and climate change.

Human Dimensions Focuses on:

Carbon management covers the various activities like climate change, CO2 capture and utilization, waste management involving both chemical and biological tools. Social impact assessment is generally ignored before planning any management strategic. Many natural, anthropogenic and societal events have to be considered before projecting sustainable carbon management strategies. So generally carbon management focuses on;

  1. minimizing emission while focusing on any developmental project aiming to make a better world to live in
  2. maximizing environmentally sound reuse, reduce and recycling for better and sustainable future; 
  3. effective treatment of threating aspects of development to ensure healthy and better world
  4. converting carbon into valuable products with atom economy to enhance livelihood options by creating more awareness on changing environmental conditions.

The idea of this conference involves designing a sustainable management plan by focusing on human dimensions of development, environment and carbon management with the compatible involvement of social and scientific aspects. The conference will focus on following sub-themes:   

Sub Themes

  1. Managing River Basins Based Development: Issues, Challenges and Solutions
  2. Technological Interventions: Role of IITs, NITs and other Research Institutions
  3. Global Water Governance for Sustainable Future
  4. Engagement of Community, Gender, Education and Leadership for Development and Carbon Management
  5. Climate Change, Water, Energy and Food Nexus: Possibilities and Challenges
  6. Challenges to Hydro based Development in Indian Himalayan Region (IHR)
  7. River basin and Carbon Management in Context of Climate Change
  8. Water Security, Climate Change and Natural Disasters
  9. Development and Disaster Management with special Reference to Himachal Pradesh
  10. River for Future: Restoration Perspective
  11. Role of Rivers in Development of Civilization: Past, Present and Future
  12. Institutional issues with Policy and Governance for Development and Carbon Management
  13. Business, Industry and Future of Carbon Management in Changing Climatic Conditions
  14. Technology, Innovation and People’s Interventions in River and Carbon Management
  15. Recent Trends in Carbon Sequestration   
  16. Waste Management
  17. Carbon Management with Ancient and Vedic Science
  18. Natural Radiation and Environment
  19. Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management
  20. Recent Trends in Environmental Biotechnology
  21. Green Techniques
  22. Natural Hazards and Climate Change

 

Submission of Abstract and Paper

The 2-day intellectual endeavour is scheduled to be organised from 11-12 December, 2016 and the venue of the conference will be School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Dharamshala, Kangra India. Academicians, Researchers, Practitioners, Planners, Administrators, NGOs from round the globe are invited to send abstract of paper maximum 250 words, explaining broadly the focus of the paper, the nature and type of study, methodology and main findings with 5 key-words , by October 10, 2016 and full length paper latest by November 10, 2016.

The selected papers will be published in the form of edited volumes of book with ISBN, therefore, you are requested to submit your paper with the references and bibliographical notes completely. Published book (s) will be released on the day of conference by Chief Guest and will be made available to all participants on concessional rates.

The abstract should be typed in 12-point, Times New Roman with no paragraph. And full length paper will be as per the international guidelines (ISBN) of paper submission. (How to contribute your paper for publication will be made available to the scholars whose papers have been finalised for publication in latter stage) .

Schedule of the Conference:

Official Notification of Conference

20.09.2016

Acceptance of Abstracts

10.10.2016

Acceptance of Sessions Chair/ reviewer

15.10.2016

Notification of the Sessions

25.10.2016

Notification of Acceptance of Abstracts

30.10.2016

Submission of Full length Paper

10.11.2016

Conference

11-12 December, 2016

 

 

 


All the submitted abstracts will be reviewed by the reviewers appointed by the scientific steering committee. The decision taken with the consultation of convenor/members of scientific steering committee would be final and will be communicated on official website: www.govtcollegechamba.com and www.cuhimachal.ac.in of the conference and himalayanclimatemeet2016@gmail.com would be official mail ID of the conference.

Registration Fee

Category of Participants

Category A* Countries

Category B*

Countries

Category C*

Countries

For Professors, Researchers, Practitioners, NGOs, Govt. officials, Policy Makers, Executors etc.

120 USD

75 USD

30 USD

Students

(on the production of Identity card)

75 USD

50 USD

20 USD

Industry

400 USD

300 USD

200 USD

 

( Registration includes access to all sessions, Welcome Reception, Souvenir, breakfasts, lunches, tea/coffee breaks).

For exchange value: https://www.google.co.in/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=ahfaV8agMLLT8gfUwbRw#q=currency+converter

Table of Economies by Category

Source: For operational and analytical purposes, the World Bank’s main criterion for classifying economies is gross national income (GNI) per capita. This classification does not necessarily reflect development status. The World Bank, September 2016, www.worldbank.org
Category A : High income.  Category B : Upper middle income.  Category C : Low and lower middle income.

Category- A

Andorra 
Antigua & Barbuda 
Argentina 
Aruba 
Australia
Austria 
Bahamas
Bahrain 
Barbados 
Belgium 
Bermuda 
Brunei 
Canada 
Cayman Is.
Channel Is.
Chile 
Croatia

Curaçao 
Cyprus 
Czech Rep.
Denmark 
Estonia 
Equatorial Guinea 
Faeroe Is.
Finland 
France 
French Polynesia
Germany
Greece
Greenland 
Guam
Hong Kong
Hungary 
Iceland

Ireland
Isle of Man 
Israel
Italy
Japan
Korea, Rep
Kuwait
Latvia 
Liechtenstein
Lithuania 
Luxembourg
Macao
Malta
Monaco
Netherlands
New Caledonia
New Zealand

Mariana Is.
Norway
Oman 
Poland
Portugal 
Puerto Rico
Qatar
San Marino
Saudi Arabia
Seychelles 
Singapore 
Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
Slovak Rep.
Slovenia
Spain
St. Kitts-Nevis

St. Martin (French part) 
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Trinidad & Tobago
Turks and Caicos Islands 
Utd Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United States
Uruguay 
Virgin Islands (US)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category- B

 

Albania
Algeria
American Samoa
Angola
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belize
Bosnia-Herzegovina
Botswana
Brazil 
Bulgaria

China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominica 
Dominican Rep.
Ecuador 
Fiji 
Gabon 
Georgia 
Grenada
Guyana

Iran
Iraq
Jamaica
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Lebanon 
Libya
Macedonia
Malaysia
Maldives 
Marshall Is. 
Mauritius

Mayotte 
Mexico
Montenegro 
Namibia 
Palau
Panama
Paraguay 
Peru 
Romania
Russian Fed.
Serbia
South Africa

St. Lucia
St. Vincent
Suriname
Thailand
Turkmenistan
Turkey
Tuvalu 
Venezuela, RB 

Category- C

 

Afghanistan
Armenia
Bangladesh
Benin
Bhutan 
Bolivia
Burkina Faso
Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Central African R.
Chad
Comoros 
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Congo, Rep. 
Côte d'Ivoire

Djibouti
Egypt
El Salvador
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Gambia 
Ghana
Guatemala 
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana 
Haiti
Honduras
India
Indonesia
Kenya 
Kiribati

Korea, Dem. Rep. 
Kosovo
Kyrgyzstan
Lao PDR
Lesotho
Liberia
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mauritania
Micronesia
Moldova
Mongolia 
Morocco
Mozambique
Myanmar
Nepal

Nicaragua
Niger
Nigeria
Pakistan
Palestine
Papua New 
Philippines
Rwanda
S. Tomé-Principe
Samoa
Senegal
Sierra Leone
Solomon Is.
Somalia 
South Sudan 
Sri Lanka 
Sudan 
Swaziland

Syria
Tajikistan
Tanzania
Timor-Leste
Togo
Tonga 
Tunisia 
Uganda
Ukraine
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Vietnam
Yemen, Rep.
Zambia
Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

Travel and Hospitality

International/national participants will be facilitated to arrange their travel from Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi to conference venue, on the submission of travel plan at least fifteen days in advance to the organisers. Participants reaching from different parts of the country at Pathankot/chakki bank Railway Stations or International and Domestic Airports (New Delhi, Gaggal, Pathankot, Amritsar, and Jammu) will be facilitated , on the submission of their travel plan at least ten days in advance to the organisers. Dharamshala domestic airport is 15 km from conference venue. Dharamshala is well connected to road transport from different parts of country with Volvo and ordinary buses, for detail: http://www.hrtchp.com/hrtctickets/  

Getting to Conference Venue

By Road: The Himachal Road Transport Corporation runs long distance services throughout the state from their main stands at Shimla, Solan, Kangra, Dharamshala and Pathankot and from locations in the adjoining states of Delhi, Punjab, Haryana and Chandigarh (UT). Details of buses is available at www.hrtc.gov.in and seat can be booked on-line.

By Rail: The nearest railway station is at Pathankot/ Chakki Bank, 60 Km from venue of the Conference and well connected with regular trains from New Delhi and other parts of the country.

By Air: The nearest Domestic Airport is at Gagal and Pathankot and International Airports are; Indira Gandhi International Airport- T-3 at New Delhi (550km), Amritsar (200km), Jammu (210Km) and Chandigarh (320Km).

Taxis: Taxis serve as the main means of traveling. Shared taxi can be hired and would be cheaper as compared to bus-fare and time. The fixed rate fares only apply to peak season and at other times one should be able to negotiate a hefty reduction from the demanded fare.

Weather in Dharmashala

December month is fine for short trips and viewing the natural beauties as it is a time when rainy season is almost at the verge of completion. Temperature in December remains between 6 to 20°C. Therefore delegates are advised to bring light warm clothe with them. For more weather detail: http://www.accuweather.com/en/in/dharmsala/188520/december-weather/188520

About Govt. College, Chamba (NAAC Accredited Institution)

To impart the education to the remotest area of the state, way back in 15 May, 1958 this college was opened. Earlier it was affiliated to the Panjab University Chandigarh. This institution has its unique history. This institution is being run in the historical Akhandi Chandi Palace, which was the princely palace of erstwhile kings of Chamba state.

Raja Umed Singh (1748-1764) had constructed the north part of the palace. In 1782 Raja Raj Singh organized Chandi (Chamunda) Path and yajna at Pakki Choki part of the palace continuous for one year, this is the reason, the palace is also known as Akhand Chandi Palace (First Campus). Darbur hall part of the palace was constructed in 1885 AD by Raja Sham Singh , and earlier it was known as Marshall Hall . Presently, this part of the college is being used for self-financed courses like; BBA, BCA and PGDCA and master courses like Hindi, English, Political Science and Economics.

The architect of Akhand Chandi Palace is influenced by Mughal and British architect. The impact of these architects can be seen clearly on all windows, doors and ventilators of the palace. On 15th of May 1958 in this historical palace the Govt. College Chamba has been started with 40 students and at present there are more than 4000 students, who are getting education in Arts, Science and Commerce and in professional courses.

About Department of Sociology, Govt. College, Chamba

The Department of Sociology has been started with the establishment of department in the Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla in 1989 with handful students and at present there are more than 550 students in the department. Dr. Raj Kumar Kaistha has the honour to start Sociology and at present one of his students Dr. Mohinder Slariya is teaching sociology. Apart from regular teaching work he is guiding national and international students for their research degrees. Dr. Slariya has been Indian delegate to Germany, Australia, Nepal, Finland and presented research papers in many international and national conferences. At present he is working with Asia Climate Change Education Centre, Jeju, South Korea.

About Asia Climate Change Education Centre (ACCEC)

ACCEC based in Jeju, South Korea was established jointly in 2009 by Jeju Local Government and Ministry of Environment of the Republic of Korea, with objectives of conducting research on the issues related to climate change and running education on climate change.

ACCEC runs two educational programs. One is General Course and the other one is Professional Course. The former is for citizens in order to leading them to environmental friendly behavior in their everyday life. The latter is for those working at government, industry and civil organization in Asia country in order for them to building their capacity.

Since 2009, about 70,000 participated in the General Course, and 16,000 from 45 countries participated in the Professional Courses.

About the Central University of Himachal Pradesh

Central University of Himachal Pradesh was established in 2010 under the central University act 1995. The aim of the university is to strive for inclusive access to excellence in higher education and research to emerge as premier institution. The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences has started M.Sc. in Environmental Science with special emphasis on Physical Sciences and Biological Sciences. The department is dedicated to protect the environment by training the students and achieving excellence in the modern and relevant scientific research in the field of Environmental Science.

About the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences was opened in 2012 with intake capacity of 30 M.Sc. student. The department has currently 6 faculty members with different specializations. It has well established Environmental Science lab including toxicology lab, waste management lab, geosciences lab with well-equipped modern scientific instruments like remote sensing and GIS, GPS, Ion Chromatography, HPLC, FTIR, XRF, PCR, Electrophoresis any many geophysical instruments. The Department has 7 sponsored projects from different funding sources.

About Dharamshala

Dharamshala city is the district headquarters of district Kangra and is located 18 km north of Kangra town. The town Dharamshala is well connected both by road and air from New Delhi and Chandigarh and also by rail from Pathankot. The town is approx. 100 km from Pathankot, approx. 250 km from Chandigarh and approx. 500 km from New Delhi which are well connected from rest of the country. There is regular flight from Delhi by Air India at 0945 Hrs and return flight at 1155 Hrs . The climate during November is pleasant, however a light warm clothing is required. The venue is located approx. 30 km away from Dharamshala on Mandi – Pathankot highway (NH-20) towards Pathankot.

For detailed weather conditions in Dharamshala, please click here:

http://www.accuweather.com/en/in/dharmsala/188520/month/188520?monyr=12/01/2016