NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCESClimate and Ecosystemshttps://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/climate-research-and-development-program/science/...

NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCESClimate and Ecosystemshttps://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/climate-research-and-development-program/science/...NEWS NOTES ON SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES
Climate and Ecosystems
https://www.usgs.gov/ecosystems/climate-research-and-development-program/science/drylands-are-highly-vulnerable-climate?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects

“Improper land use during drought has been a major driver of land degradation in drylands globally, especially in the western U.S. Increasing aridity in western U.S. drylands under future climates will exacerbate risks associated with drought and land use decisions. This project provides critical observational, experimental, and modelling evidence to support our DOI partners with decision processes aimed and avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating undesired changes due to drought and land change.”

“Drylands comprise approximately 35% of Earth’s terrestrial biomes, with over 1 billion people depending on these landscapes for their livelihoods. In the U.S., drylands comprise about 40% of the landmass and 83% of Department of Interior managed lands (excluding Alaska). A substantial rise in temperature (~ 6°C) and changes in precipitation are predicted for these regions. These water-limited ecosystems are often characterized by low resilience to warming and drying, and therefore small environmental changes can have vast and unexpected ecological consequences. With large predicted shrifts in climate for dryland regions, impacts to wildlife, livestock, and human populations dependent on these resources are likely to be profound and widespread. As a result, drylands have been identified as one of three regions that will be most vulnerable to climate change by both IPCC and the USGS Climate Change team.”