New bioremediation material can clean 'forever chemicals'

New bioremediation material can clean 'forever chemicals'

New bioremediation material can clean 'forever chemicals'
by Helen White, Texas A&M University

PFAS are adsorbed into the cell wall of the plant material. When the fungus consumes the plant, it also eats the chemical that was adsorbed.

A novel bioremediation technology for cleaning up per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, chemical pollutants that threaten human health and ecosystem sustainability, has been developed by Texas A&M AgriLife researchers. The material has potential for commercial application for disposing of PFAS, also known as "forever chemicals."

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Credit: Susie Dai


Published July 28 in Nature Communications, the research was a collaboration of Susie Dai, Ph.D., associate professor in the Texas A&M Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, and Joshua Yuan, Ph.D., chair and professor in Washington University in St. Louis Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, formerly with the Texas A&M Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology.

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